Séminaires

 

 

Caroline Floccia, Plymouth University, School of Psychology (Faculty of Health & Human Sciences)

 January 23 2017, 11h   Salle de réunion du LPP, H432, 4ème étage, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75006 Paris

Which factors predict vocabulary knowledge in 2-year-old bilingual toddlers? Effects of linguistic distance and contextual variables

Young bilingual children typically underperform on language development measures relative to monolingual norms. Detecting genuine language delay, beyond this bilingual difference, is confounded by the range of interacting situational factors and possible language combinations that modulate the rate of development. For the first time we provide norms of development of expressive and receptive vocabulary for 2-year-old toddlers learning British English and one Additional Language (AL) out of diverse set of 13 (Bengali, Cantonese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hindi-Urdu, Italian, Mandarin, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish and Welsh). These norms are based on CDI measures of vocabulary modulated by a range of predictors of bilingual development (amount of exposure to each language, proportion of each language in parental overheard speech, infant gender) identified in a comprehensive survey. We also show that linguistic distance based on measures of phonological overlap predicts receptive and expressive vocabulary in English and the AL. Finally, we integrate these predictors to develop UKBTAT, an online tool for the estimation of expected vocabulary size in 2-year-old bilingual UK-raised toddlers.

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Hinze Hogendoorn, Department of Experimental Psychology, Utrecht University

 January 24 2017, 11h   Salle de réunion du LPP, H432, 4ème étage, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75006 Paris

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Olivier Pascalis, Laboratoire de Psychologie et Neurocognition, Grenoble

 January 30 2017, 11h   Salle de réunion du LPP, H432, 4ème étage, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75006 Paris

The role of experience on the development of face processing during the first year of life.

Faces are perhaps the most predominant visual stimulus in children’s environment. From birth onwards, children encounter thousands of faces. These faces vary in terms of not only identity, but also gender, age, attractiveness, species, and race. Given the adaptive significance of the face processing ability, the hypothesis about an innate disposition to such ability is appealing. Exactly which components of the face processing system are present at birth, which develop first, and at what stage the system becomes adult-like are still hotly debated topics. I will review evidence accumulated in the last several decades that suggests the prominent role of experience in shaping children’s face processing expertise, which in turn forms a foundation for later face expertise in adulthood and also affects their social interaction.

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Casimir Ludwig, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol

 February 20 2017, 11h   Salle de réunion du LPP, H432, 4ème étage, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75006 Paris

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